Category: Rumblings

When Competition Becomes a Performance

Today Alexander Zverev GER [4] takes on Roger Federer SUI [2] and  Caroline Wozniacki DEN [6] confronts the zoning Elina Svitolina UKR [5] at the Rogers Cup, the third stop on the US Open Series. Tennis fans have reveled in the tournament for the last seven days. Riding the highs of new player wins and veterans missing the mark. All of it is glorious. The competition has us stuck on the coach. We perch or recline with fixed glaze trying to sort out the field, from those who have been rocketing of late, Svitlolina, to the previously injured and returning, Stephens. (more…)

Should Consistency be Tennis’ Holy Grail?

consistencyroutineAs a child I detested desserts. Cakes. Pies. Pastries. Even ice cream did not make my wish list. Yes, I was an odd child who could be bribed with wait for it …roasted sunflower seeds. A mature adult now, I have taken to baking. My repertoire includes: pound cake, carrot cake, pineapple upside down cake, banana nut bread, pumpkin pie and cheesecake. When I first began I was fastidious. Testing recipes, tweaking, perfecting until my creations achieved just the right denseness and sweetness. I dislike overly sweet concoctions. Sometimes the final products were beautiful and delectable treats perfect for gifting. Sometimes, they were simply lessons I had to learn.

My consistency was not particularly important when I began baking. The experience, the process was my goal. This is a lesson tennis has not embraced. It may never move beyond consistency as the hallmark of success. The obsession with consistency is really a need for perfection. This  mars the sport.  (more…)

Hey Mama: How Clair Huxtable Changed Motherhood on TV

The TV mothers of my childhood are ever-present. They too are part of the language I speak. Their stories are part of my memory: Lucy Ricardo (I Love Lucy, 1951), Carol Brady (The Brady Bunch, 1969), Olivia Walton (The Waltons, 1971), Edith Bunker (All in the Family, 1971), Florida Evans (Good Times, 1974), Louise Jefferson (The Jeffersons, 1975), and Clair Huxtable (The Cosby Show, 1984). I liked these mothers, but I was critical of them. They were not real. Their perfectly imagined lives were fun escapism. They were an extension of my schooling, my American indoctrination. The mothers in children’s stories and by extension TV, film, music and literature are idealized. They are nurtures, teachers, protectors. These TV mothers showed me what Wendy Darling told the Lost Boys in Peter Pan.   (more…)